On The Level Podcast

Unlocking the Secrets of the Seven Liberal Arts in Freemasonry

January 27, 2024 Christopher Burns Season 2 Episode 25
On The Level Podcast
Unlocking the Secrets of the Seven Liberal Arts in Freemasonry
On The Level Podcast
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Join Fred, myself, and the illustrious Most Worshipful Foster as we venture into the heart of Masonry, where personal growth meets age-old wisdom. Our conversation acts as a lantern, illuminating the path of the seven liberal arts, the profound influence of geometry on our civilization, and the role of music in harmonizing the human experience. It's a rare opportunity to overhear tales from our grandmaster's visit, insights from Masonic gatherings, and how these experiences shape our lives beyond the lodge.

We weave through the tapestry of history and modernity, questioning the legacy of colonization and projecting a future that beckons with cooperation and transformative change. As we reflect on the societal narrative, you'll witness our debate on the state of innovation in today's world, and how the promise of a 'fourth turning' could herald an era of unprecedented renewal. Our discussion offers a candid look at the interplay between past actions and future possibilities, as we ponder the responsibilities bestowed upon us by the generations that walk in our wake.

Our episode culminates in a celebration of the spirit of Freemasonry, revealing how the language and values of our fraternity—love, service, and community—resonate through our daily actions and interactions. We share the excitement surrounding our interview with Most Worshipful Foster, a conversation that promises to spark both reflection and action. Embrace the insights from our discussion as we invite you to fortify your commitments and join us in the perpetual endeavor to uplift others and craft a society of greater understanding and compassion.

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Speaker 1:

Hey, chris, yeah, fred, what's a Mason?

Speaker 2:

That's a really good question, fred.

Speaker 1:

You've reached the internet's home for all things masonry. Join Chris and I as we plumb the depths of our ancient craft, from the common gavel to the trowel. Nothing is off the table, so grab your tools and let's get to work. This is On the Level. Well, we are back. We are back, thank you.

Speaker 2:

The claps don't come through in the recording.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, they do. Now I fixed it. So yes, everyone got the clap. Did they get this? I hope they did. I see it on it's registering on the sound board. Yeah, so we're making advances here and there as we go, so thank you very much. Sound engineer Fred, who doesn't know what he's doing but is learning.

Speaker 2:

Traction, who didn't know what he was doing.

Speaker 1:

Didn't know. Now he knows, does now.

Speaker 2:

And knowing is half the battle.

Speaker 1:

Wow, what up, what up, brother.

Speaker 2:

You know, just another day in paradise.

Speaker 3:

Yeah right.

Speaker 2:

Lots of interesting things going on. We have our grandmasters official visit to our district 23 tonight. Very excited, which will be well passed over when you hear this.

Speaker 1:

Yes, that's right, and I took all of my stuff to the dry cleaners to get cleaned, not realizing that I need it tonight.

Speaker 2:

So you need flip flops with socks?

Speaker 1:

Well, I'm hoping and praying that it will be done. I dropped it off on Tuesday. They're usually pretty quick, but if not, I'm going to have to figure something else out, because this, of all nights, this would be the night to make sure you're dressed correctly.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, no, I told my wife we have to sit at the big table this time because I'm the president of the master mason association.

Speaker 3:

Right, so I have to sit up there with those guys. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Speaker 2:

And I'm like she got dressed nice and she's like, ooh, she got all excited. And she's like going through her closet. She's like, how sexy can I get? I'm like sexies you want baby.

Speaker 1:

How sexy can you be?

Speaker 2:

I'm just going to be mad about that, right on. So we'll see what she comes up with tonight. Well, that will be a good look on you, my brother, yeah, right, absolutely yeah for her, yeah, and for our district, and for our district, that's right, I was at the shrine last night. And they were setting the tables and setting up the room Sahib shrine.

Speaker 1:

The Sahib shrine Sarasota Sahib shrine, which I am a member of.

Speaker 2:

Oh, they're getting it all prepped and ready.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, oh yeah they were all in there setting tables out, and the big table that you're talking about was set, so I know exactly where you're going to be sitting. I'll be sitting in the very back corner.

Speaker 2:

Being quiet. Hopefully the lodges have tables.

Speaker 1:

Yes.

Speaker 2:

Hopefully we'll have a bunch of people at a table from Sarasota Lodge Well.

Speaker 1:

I will definitely be there. I know Shaefer's coming.

Speaker 2:

Is your wife coming.

Speaker 1:

She is not. She's busy, unfortunately, and she made you know this has been obviously in the plant in the works for a while. She already had something planned. So nope, going to be stag, which is fine, I don't plan on staying late unless we're going to record there and we're still kind of waiting to see.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I'm going to have to send some texts and see if we can get some.

Speaker 1:

Right, there is a room that we can use to record in. So and I, you know we're the this this system is easily moved, so we'll set it up there and hopefully maybe we could get the one I dropped off and blew a foster.

Speaker 2:

Yes, that's the person that was going most wishful. Foster was the first one Most wishful.

Speaker 1:

foster would be great if we could redo his that interview of his. It breaks my heart that we lost that. I lost it because it was so good, it was so, so good, and so we will be uploading the cat Sula, cat Sula cat. Sula's interview. I did. We do have it, and it's just a matter of converting it from that gigantic, massive wave file to an MP3.

Speaker 2:

So yes, three hours later it'll be done. We finally recovered our very first recording with right wishful Tom Haber.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, that was great.

Speaker 2:

We're the first one and well, now being our like sixth interview we publish right.

Speaker 1:

So, and we've always confessed to everybody listening that we, we really don't know what we're doing, but we're learning, we are learning, we are learning.

Speaker 2:

So the hard way, making every mistake along the way.

Speaker 1:

Well, we'll, we'll let that one pass by. But, yes, amen, brother, yeah, yeah, hey, hey, we're willing to own up to our mistakes, we are willing to apologize for our mistakes.

Speaker 2:

That's the key.

Speaker 1:

And that's the key, and we are willing to learn from our mistakes.

Speaker 2:

So if you admit you made a mistake, you feel really bad and you learn from it. Was it a bad thing.

Speaker 1:

I don't know. It sounds like we're. You know we're working to figure out how we can best work and live to get. I don't know how's it go.

Speaker 2:

Again, I forget best work and best agree. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

So that's all about hey, forgiveness, mercy, humility, correction, moving on being better, all about it, man, I'm all about that.

Speaker 2:

We're always open to your feedback. If you think we're doing a poor job, just send Fred an email at Fred and, on the level of Fred and Chris, comment and what you think.

Speaker 1:

I will take it. I will take it. I speaking of emails that I've received you got some good ones, I got some, some really good emails from a lot of brothers and comments on. Facebook and comments to. For everybody who is aware of the situation that happened in my life and my family's life, and for everybody who reached out to me. Please know that every single email, every single text, every message that I received was was just huge in my, in my life. I just I have. I asked my wife last night. We were sitting there at home talking and I said are we, are we handling this in an inappropriate way? Because I am not. I, I feel like I should be more broken. I feel like I should be more emotional. I feel like I should. I'm not an emotional person to begin with because of your situation, because of the situation she's and she's like, well, no, because of the amount of support we have and because of you know our faith and we, we know that, we know, you know where, where he is, so we're we're able to grieve in a different way. And I was like, yeah, you know, that's right, that's right and I'm grateful for that. And those cards, the cards and letters this is how old I am, catch up to the 90s, fred. Your emails and your texts, my telegrams, all those telegrams from.

Speaker 3:

Western Union.

Speaker 2:

Yeah so lots of faxes from the brothers are you the facts yes, fax machine.

Speaker 1:

The only people that use a fax machine, of course, is the local governments. They still do like the building department. They still use a fax machine, I don't get it and lots and lots and lots of paper, because they're so green. Anyways, we'll stop right there.

Speaker 2:

Well, I'll say my mother recently passed right and. I had similar situations. People were telling me you're handling this weird or whatever. But I had a good friend who said I want you to know however you feel about the situation is the right way.

Speaker 3:

You're right.

Speaker 2:

There's no wrong way to handle a situation like this Amen brother, that's right. That's it is. Whatever you're feeling is a valid good thing for you to be feeling right now and if it's nothing or what other people think you should be feeling. They're wrong. Now you, you know you're going to deal with this on your time and you'll go through the whole range sooner or later.

Speaker 3:

That's very true. Sooner or later, you're going to hit it all.

Speaker 2:

This is how it is right now. So you know, feel blessed that you feel this way right now.

Speaker 1:

I totally agree with what you just said. This is us doing it. There is no right or wrong. It is the, however, your hand. I told my son my other son the same thing, how you know he's questioning this and questioning that's like this is you dealing with it? And for anybody out there who's dealing with tough situations, you know and you're and other people might be putting stuff on you or you're putting stuff on yourself just stop for a second and realize that the way you're going through it is the way you're going through it, if you know what I mean if you get my drift there it is. That's what it is, and if it's painful, if it's hard or if all of a sudden you feel relieved or joyous, it is that's the way you go through it.

Speaker 2:

It's all the time. It's all the time.

Speaker 1:

That's you doing it. Yeah, that's right man.

Speaker 2:

And you go through the others too over time. Oh, I know, I already feel it. You know what happened.

Speaker 1:

I mean after the, after the memorial service, it was began that anticlimactic downward move right where, all of a sudden, all these emotions came about and I, just I was just. Anyway, to all those who reached out, I'm proud to be affiliated with you in this great fraternity. You guys really showed up in a major way in my life and I know I'm in the right house.

Speaker 2:

It seems like you know this situation had a positive impact on this really bad situation you're dealing with.

Speaker 1:

It really did, it really did. And my, my youngest son, my second youngest son sorry, danny, danny boy, danny boys, my youngest, eric, would be my second youngest and I was telling Eric that the same thing that we're we're going to, we're not going to forget, we're going to move on and we're going to make something positive out of this, and that's already happened in the family, there's a lot of positive things going on and some rededications and just some, some things happening. So, whatever you're going throughout their brother, please know that if you're a Mason today, you you have a huge family of people that will step up and do anything for you. You are, you are not short of brothers, not short of people who will, who will step up and help you, and I'm one of them. So feel free to yell out, to shout out to me I owe, I'm on the, I'm on the I owe side and I'm ready to. I'm ready to share, I'm ready to give and I'm ready to help. So let's move on to what's next. I think we're going to jump into the fellow craft lecture and having gone through the monitor, I'm realizing that there's a giant chunk of it we have to skip, just because a lot of it is not published.

Speaker 2:

So what we thought just for the Mason, that's just for us just for us, not for everybody out there. So it might be annoying thinking why did they keep talking like that? Well, fred and I both did a lot of research before we became Masons. We consumed a lot of videos and podcasts correct and we're well aware that people may seek this podcast out as a source of information. And so while we are here to talk to our brothers, we're also talking to people that are just interested in freeing me. That's right. That's why I say things like that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's right, and our secrets are our secrets. We hold them dear to our hearts. It's part of our fraternity. None of it, none of it. None of it is nefarious in nature at all. There is no nefarious side to Masonry. Sorry, alex Jones, you can you always beat up, alex Jones?

Speaker 2:

I've never listened to Alex Jones in my life.

Speaker 1:

That means you're normal. Really, that guy's a weirdo man.

Speaker 2:

It's just the guy that just got sued or lost a lot. Oh yeah, he got sued for like a gazillion dollars.

Speaker 1:

Something dummy said but here's the part that most people don't realize. He got sued for a gazillion dollars and laughed at it because that guy's got so much money really from pushing his ridiculous garbage over the years, free masonry, oh, all the time. Oh no, we're the devil, oh no, the reason the federal government is, is pretty much owned by Freemasonry, and we are, you know, and he patronizes people like me where he says well, the average Freemason, he's just you know a civic? No, you're not special he does spaghetti dinners and but he doesn't really know what he's into. It's like Jones you don't know what you're into.

Speaker 2:

Well, where is the nefarious part then?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, where is it?

Speaker 2:

The mass of the people involved don't know. Doesn't that mean they don't see? Yeah, right, right. So, where is it like? Where's all the bad stuff happening? In a secret room, somewhere where?

Speaker 1:

the lizard people stay. Right. Where does that? Where's it happening? Right, because there are lodges all over the world. Right, everywhere you go, there are lodges all over the world, and if you just knock on the door and go inside and ask them what they're up to, they'll tell you Was Washington a lizard guy?

Speaker 3:

Yeah right, galileo.

Speaker 2:

Right, all these people were horrible people.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, come on, man come on.

Speaker 2:

You're head out your butt.

Speaker 1:

I try to tell people all the time. You know it, originally there was a guy named Art Bell. Have you ever heard of Art Bell? No, art Bell did a show and it was a radio show he did for a long, long time and the name of the show it eludes me, but it was. It was an entertainment show where he proposed all of these conspiracy theories and he entertained them and he was big into aliens and this is back in the 80s. You know I mean way back when. Coast to coast AM, coast to coast AM. That was it and the original show once he, I think he passed away, dreamland he had a show named Dreamland and Dreamland too. Yeah, and they they took the show and they kept it going, I think after he either retired or passed away and it became. It was really dumb. But when it was live originally, when the show was live coast to coast AM, it was kind of fun, it was entertaining. But I don't know if Art Bell ever really he. There was nothing nefarious about it. It was a entertaining show where he kind of dabbled in these little occult things and and and alien stuff and and brought the latest and greatest of the conspiracy theory world. But it wasn't an Alex Jones thing where he's actually trying to hurt people, you know, where he's actually trying to make money off of spreading all kinds of BS and hate and stuff like that. You know this guy was. It was kind of fun, you know. I mean the original show anyways. You know it was kind of fun and that was during the X files. When that first came out, that show, the X files, art Bell was really big. Some people say that they took a lot of that stuff from the Art Bell show that show. One of my favorite shows ever would be the X files, just because I'm, I'm such a Vince Gilligan. I'm a Vince Gilligan fanatic. I think the man's brilliant.

Speaker 2:

You know he did Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul Best shows ever on television my wife refused to watch them because they were drug shows and she's anti drugs, right. And I said you don't understand, this isn't a pro drug show.

Speaker 1:

Not at all. Not at all, you're gonna agree with the.

Speaker 2:

The consequences of being involved in drugs is bad.

Speaker 1:

The the way it's portrayed. Take it from someone who knows it is very, very realistic. They did their homework. They know what they're talking about. Anyway, I'm not trying to push Breaking Bad on anybody, but you should watch it. But anyway, I don't know where we're going with that. Oh right, we're back to. So what we decided, guys, is that we skipped a lot of the middle section, only because it's it's, it's just not. There's giant chunks of it that are not published. So we can't do that. We wouldn't do that. So we skipped up to the seven liberal arts and sciences part of the lecture, which to me is really huge, and we're gonna start at the part where it says the seven liberal arts and sciences are grammar, rhetoric, logic, arithmetic, geometry, music and astronomy, and worshipful Burns is gonna take it from there.

Speaker 2:

All of them are totally.

Speaker 3:

Every stop me if we're getting close to everything, to the end of the lecture and they should

Speaker 2:

be, because these are well-known. You know this is part of our culture, it really is as humans, while we're talking about, in the winding stairs, part of this right and the seven liberal arts and sciences.

Speaker 1:

It comes from the classical teachings of Aristotle. Yeah, the great and the Greeks and liberal means. It liberates you the the. The knowledge of these arts and sciences liberates you from the bondage of ignorance. That's what the liberal part is. So the liberal arts and sciences would liberate a man from the bondage of ignorance by being educated in these classical education parts.

Speaker 2:

So I think by liberal they mean academic right. I mean it's more like leaning towards the academic than the like physical, engineering, like science. This is like thinking philosophy kind of side of looking at life and nature if you, if you liberalism and that kind of a meaning.

Speaker 1:

I think well maybe if you, if you Google the seven liberal arts and sciences, you will see it's a specific, it's a specific train, a specific course of teaching from, from the Greek classics, and they'll tell you that the word liberal means that it liberates from the the darkness of ignorance. So if you learn these, these seven liberal arts and sciences, they will liberate you from ignorance. Interesting so and it makes sense, because the first one is grammar.

Speaker 2:

Is the key by which alone the door may be open to the understanding of speech.

Speaker 1:

It is by rhetoric right, so the next one being rhetoric, so you want me to read the optional part. Yeah, for grammar, no one ever reads that one because the darn thing's already so long. yeah, let's see. So it up. It is grammar which reveals the admirable art of language and unfolds its various Constituents, it's constituent parts constituent, maybe, constituent, constituent, constituent yeah sorry, let me slow down, I apparently have had too much coffee as always and unfolds its various constituent parts, its names, definitions and respective offices. It it unravels, as it were, the thread of which the web of speech is composed. These reflections seldom occur to anyone before his acquaintance with the art. Yet it is most certain that without a knowledge of grammar, it is difficult to speak with propriety, precision and purity wow, it's so eloquently stated.

Speaker 2:

Right, right, I want to learn how to talk like this when I grow up. Well, and remember in my earliest memories of school.

Speaker 1:

I did not have a good experience with government school system, but my earliest memories are grammar.

Speaker 3:

Really.

Speaker 1:

Well learning cursive.

Speaker 2:

Which they don't teach in school anymore. They don't teach anymore Freaking amazing Right.

Speaker 1:

They don't teach any of the Seven Lower Arts and Sciences in school very much anymore. But the next one being rhetoric, Go.

Speaker 2:

Rhetoric. It is by rhetoric that the art of speaking eloquently is acquired, so grammar is OK. I think I'm picking this up more. Grammar is maybe understanding the system of how language works.

Speaker 3:

Correct.

Speaker 2:

How do you form words and sentences to make cohesive, right Paragraphs that tell your point eloquently and simply? And now we're saying rhetoric is the art of coloring that. Oh, that's good In such a way as it is interesting to hear the grammar that you've put together right.

Speaker 1:

Right, so it says. It unravels, as it were, the thread of which the web of speech is composed, and rhetoric, the web of speech. Rhetoric is the art of speaking.

Speaker 2:

So right.

Speaker 1:

So grammar unlocks the web.

Speaker 2:

The mystery, the difficulty of speech, because it's not enough to just communicate succinctly.

Speaker 3:

Right.

Speaker 2:

Clearly you have to also do it emotionally. Get the person you're talking to emotionally invested in what you're saying.

Speaker 1:

And that's where rhetoric comes in, and then, by extension, go with logic.

Speaker 2:

Oh, logic is that science which directs us to form clear and distinct ideas of things and prevents us from being misled by their similitude and resemblance.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so logic. If you take grammar and rhetoric and learn them, the next logical step is logic. I think it's also dialectic is the other word that's used there Dialectic Dialectic is the other word. So logic is the science which directs us to form clear and distinct ideas of things, thereby prevents us from being misled by their similitude or resemblance.

Speaker 2:

So basically, two ideas that are very similar. It takes logic to identify what the meaning of that is, based on the context, right.

Speaker 1:

Well, logic forces us to look at a thing and try to figure it out or decipher it. Like when you look at something and it doesn't make sense, it's not logical, e-logical, it's illogical, right Right. So, but what? The study and understanding of logic forces us to reason in our minds? A thing, so, whatever it is. I have a very mechanical mind, so for me the logic of a thing is like something that I spent a lot of time thinking about, because, having been a builder and having been around engineers and architects got to help me for so many years. The logic of it, how does it work? How does it make sense? Why is it ticking the way it's ticking? That's the logic and learning. That thing is huge. And I think these first three grammar, rhetoric and logic prepare us for this fourth one, which is arithmetic. Bless you.

Speaker 2:

Arithmetic is the art of numbering or that part of mathematics which considers the properties of numbers in general Right. And advanced Hate mathematics Well, but I need to learn to love it Well the world.

Speaker 1:

Creation is based on mathematics. I mean advanced mathematics is how we explain the world. Sir Isaac Newton's equation for identifying gravity is the calculus. That's where the calculus came from. Correct me if I'm wrong. Out there at Math Heads You're probably all screaming at it. What is this idea talking about? But his equation? He did not explain what gravity is, but he explained how gravity acts and he created a mathematical equation to figure it out. Terminal velocity. It's known as terminal velocity. So if I drop a bowling ball and a marble, this is physics, right Next to each other out of an airplane, they're going to reach a certain speed going to the ground and they will not exceed that speed because of gravity. Well, the equation to figure that out is part of Newton's law of gravity. That's part of it, and that's mathematics, advanced mathematics. They use mathematics to figure out. When they put Gemini up into space back in the 80s, which was a probe that was to go to the outer reaches of space, they mathematically figured out exactly when the thing was going to pass by Jupiter which was like 15 years and seven months, two days, five hours and 34 minutes 58 seconds into the future. And guess what happened.

Speaker 3:

It passed by exactly at that time which.

Speaker 1:

I thought, was absolutely amazing to me.

Speaker 2:

It's proof that the mathematics works.

Speaker 1:

It's empirical proof that that mathematical truth you can understand things that you can't see. That's right. That's right. So, and of course, all science is based on hypothesis. So we hypothesize an idea and then we spend our lifetime trying to disprove it, and that's the way science works. It's debated amongst those in the field over and over and over again, to try and disprove it. And if you can't disprove it year after year after year, well guess what? That's science, baby.

Speaker 2:

That's the real deal, it's our working theory. Right, and it's always a theory. That's our working theory.

Speaker 1:

It's the working theory Because we haven't been able to disprove it, because time marches on and we discover new things all the time, oh God. We're living in an insane time for science, right now, right, you were telling me about something pretty cool I had a conversation with that company yesterday Did you?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I met the CEO. I talked with this PhD who's working with this university on trying to bring this technology into the world.

Speaker 1:

Now, do we talk about this at the last podcast? I don't think we do, no.

Speaker 2:

I talk to you privately.

Speaker 1:

I haven't told anyone about it. Give us a little bit.

Speaker 2:

OK, quantum science has unlocked all new thinking and it's shattering what we think we know about current laws of the universe. Like you just mentioned, gravity Gravity doesn't apply at the quantum level the way it does in our realm.

Speaker 1:

And that kind of makes sense to me, right, because I'm on Earth, I'm standing on Earth.

Speaker 2:

Yeah Well, a great example. I was watching a documentary last night. Did you know we have two probes studying the sun right?

Speaker 3:

now.

Speaker 2:

The Parker telescope, and there's another one specifically taking images of the surface.

Speaker 3:

OK.

Speaker 2:

And what you said, the Gemini probe and they did all this math and it wound up at precisely where they thought it was going to be based on the gravitational pull of the planets and the thrust of this thing. Well, the sun's awfully hot. Yeah, kind of, and so you can't have a direct orbit around the sun or the thing will melt obviously.

Speaker 3:

Right.

Speaker 2:

So what they did with this Parker probe, which is taking readings of the surface of the sun, is they put it into an orbit in such a way that it goes really close to the sun on one side, and the closer you get, the faster the gravitational pull. So it's traveling insanely fast through that hottest part of its journey around the sun and it fires back out into space at this crazy velocity. And then they use Venus, the pole of Venus, to slow it down. So it slowly comes back, that is so awesome and it's making these zippies and then it goes slow around Venus and comes back and does a zippy and it's able to record the surface of the sun every pass it makes.

Speaker 1:

All done by the gravitational pushing and pulling of planets, and or the sun that's multiple planets in this case are being used Like you see that in Star Trek right.

Speaker 3:

Right, 70s and 80s. Oh right, yeah, we're doing this in science now.

Speaker 1:

That's so cool they're calling it a slingshot orbit.

Speaker 2:

I love it.

Speaker 3:

I love it yeah.

Speaker 2:

And then there's another probe that's meant to just take the photos, because they're trying to understand how the coronal mass ejections happen, because it obviously can affect us here on Earth.

Speaker 1:

Right, right. I think I know for you that.

Speaker 2:

Fascinated by all this stuff.

Speaker 1:

Right, you're fascinated by it and I'm the beneficiary of his fascination because he shares it all with me and I just I don't look it up on my own. So I'm glad you shared it with everybody else too.

Speaker 2:

What's really interesting. What we were talking about is, at the quantum level, the vacuum of space. We thought it was called dark matter, just emptiness right in there and now, because of our ability to study at the quantum level, we're understanding that particles come into and out of reality constantly in the vacuum of space, in the emptiness of the vacuum of space. And so it's if there's like a sponge level in the entire emptiness of space and the fact that there's a vacuum and this energy is coming into and out of existence allows the energy to travel freely because there's no resistance, air or other particles to bounce off of at the atomic level. And so they done experiments where they put two metal plates in a crazy vacuum that did a little bit of stimulus to these particles that come into and out of existence at the quantum level, and the plates moved in the vacuum with no energy, nothing pushing, nothing visible, nothing recordable. In the emptiness of the vacuum of space there's an invisible force that moves those plates. So they said wait a second, if this energy is everywhere all the time. This is where Tesla was. He wanted to pull energy out of what he called the ether. In those days he didn't understand what the ether was, but now we understand that the quantum level there is something that he thought was the ether that you can pull energy out of and harness it. So there are companies out there trying to make devices, using these experiments that have been reproduced and proven are true, to effectively generate an unlimited, never ending supply of energy out of the quantum popping in and out of particles in the vacuum of space Without generating massive amounts of radiation or heat. There's no byproduct there is no radiation, there is no heat, there's no chemical reaction, there's nothing but power.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but what are we gonna do with all these oil companies? This?

Speaker 2:

is why it doesn't exist yet.

Speaker 1:

They've known about this since the 20s.

Speaker 2:

There's a documentary called the Lost Generation, because it's been stolen from us. We had the power to have basically clean renewable energy in the 20s, but it's been buried because corporations run the world.

Speaker 1:

Well, thank you, Thomas Edison. Right, he's the one who basically ruined Tesla, stole all of his ideas, got with Westinghouse and the rest is history. Edison, Thomas Edison.

Speaker 2:

Really.

Speaker 1:

Everybody thinks he's the big hero, big inventor, but actually he was just a really crooked businessman really what he was.

Speaker 2:

I guess that goes back to the winners. Write the history. That's right.

Speaker 1:

The winners write history, that's right. The winners write the history books, that's right. But I mean remember. I always try to tell people who want to tell me Edison was such a great man. He's the man who invented the electric chair. So let's remember who this man really is.

Speaker 2:

So in his the electric chair, the electric chair, the one they used to kill people.

Speaker 1:

So in his desire to ruin Tesla because Tesla's electricity was AC, was alternating current, which is high voltage. It's very dangerous, but it can travel long distances over cable and provide a greater benefit to more and more people. Where Edison's original discovery was DC direct current electricity, which is much weaker and is not high voltage, that's low voltage, so very different types of electricity. Since Tesla's idea was better, it was gaining in popularity and getting much more notoriety. So what Edison did is he created this publicity campaign touting the dangers of this new technology called high voltage electricity and to prove it he created the electric chair. Oh, and showed how you can go, and showed how it kills people and, of course, our government, in its wisdom, took it on. And now we fry people's brain.

Speaker 2:

We're still doing it in stark. They still do it, they still have a chair, they still use that thing they call them, sparky, that's a. I don't know, man, why not?

Speaker 1:

you know what? I just bashed their head in with a baseball bat. I mean, what's the difference? I mean we're supposed to be humane? Yeah, there's nothing humane about the electric chair.

Speaker 2:

Don't care no. You know, just don't care what anybody says I think generally I mean lethal injection is the way they do it, and I think mostly now.

Speaker 1:

Well, that's probably the right way. I am not a fan of capital punishment. I do not want to give this current government and or its regimes the ability to execute anybody. I think it's dangerous. There was a time in this country where capital punishment might have been this is my opinion. So send your cards and letters to Chris Dang. It I'll take them. Chris on the level with friendchriscom, but I just it could have been a time in this country where it was a deterrent to violent crime, to murder and all that capital punishment. But I don't agree with that anymore. It's time that this government should not be allowed to execute anybody ever. Until we get a handle on the administrative state, which is completely out of control. My opinion let's move on.

Speaker 2:

You need to somehow take the corporate's ability to control government away. If you really want to fix it, give it back to the people.

Speaker 3:

Right.

Speaker 2:

And you know free, clean energy is a great way to start.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that sure is. That's why they hate Bitcoin so much because you can't control it, you know. And what your government wants you to know is you're not allowed to have money that we can't steal from you, right? And that's what Bitcoin is it's money they can't take from you without you giving them permission first. Well, this would be the same thing An energy source that I can have in my house that does not need outside approval, outside aid of any kind from anyone produces.

Speaker 2:

No, not gonna blow up on you, yep.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, we can't have that.

Speaker 2:

Okay, you can take it in a cave.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

And basically live for your entire lifetime with free energy.

Speaker 1:

Listen, if you keep this up, what's Ted Cruz gonna do for a living? I? Mean come on and what's Nancy gonna do, what are all these elites gonna do if we become autonomous, 100% autonomous, just dealing with each other with love and respect? Can't have it, man. That's not gonna work.

Speaker 2:

Well, I had a great meeting yesterday.

Speaker 1:

Do I sound cynical?

Speaker 2:

A little, but this is where I'm at too All right, I'm sorry.

Speaker 1:

I'm with you on that. You had a great meeting yesterday.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, because I'm pessimistic on the future of humanity. I think we're going to know, we're gonna you know, there's not much we can do at this point.

Speaker 1:

We're going in a very bad direction.

Speaker 2:

Negative outlook. That's where I've been.

Speaker 1:

I see that in you yeah.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So it's like oh, what's the point of anything, we're all gonna burn out here. You know so the fact that go watch a documentary by Dr Steven Greer named the Lost Century, and they do a pretty good job of explaining the concept of zero point energy and how it's been proven and how it can be done. And I found a company that actually has a patent the only patent I have ever seen on a device that can do this and they're working with the university. They're seeking the last round of funding to actually bring this to market. They're gonna start with flashlights and little things.

Speaker 3:

That's cool.

Speaker 2:

And I got to meet with a PhD. I got to meet with his wife and the CEO of this company and we're gonna help them. I actually reached out to Steven Greer to try to get him involved in what they're doing.

Speaker 1:

That's so awesome.

Speaker 2:

It's crazy. It's crazy the opportunities we have because of science. It's like Real science. It's not like a university or government it should be or is controlling these things. It's happening so fast that the people on the bleeding edge are the ones making these things a reality.

Speaker 3:

Right right.

Speaker 1:

The crazy scientists that are part of mainstream you know academia, those who are free to think and explore. You know what is in front of them? Yeah, those guys.

Speaker 2:

It's just a fun time to be alive and I have some hope finally for the future. So it's nice. Well, good, it's a very nice feeling.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I see that, and we definitely want updates regarding this new venture that you're looking into. Yeah, give us the updates, and when it comes time to invest, please let us know.

Speaker 2:

Yes, there will be, and I will let you know.

Speaker 1:

All right, so geometry.

Speaker 2:

Geometry oh, this is a big one for Freemasonry.

Speaker 3:

Yeah geometry.

Speaker 2:

Start me off there. Geometry treats. Geometry treats of the powers and properties of magnitudes in general, where length, breadth and thickness are considered From a point to a line, from a line to a super feces and from super feces to a solid. Okay, a point is the beginning of all geometric matter. Right, a line is a continuation of the same. A super feces has length and breadth without a given thickness. A solid has length and breadth with a given thickness and forms a cube which comprehends the whole. That's getting a little deep. That's awesome Into geometry. But it treats of the powers and properties of magnitudes in general.

Speaker 3:

Right, right.

Speaker 2:

The powers and properties of magnitudes.

Speaker 1:

All right, so in general there's. The next heading is called the advantages of geometry. It starts out by geometry.

Speaker 2:

The architect is unable to construct his plans and execute his designs. The engineer to mark out grounds for encampment. The general to arrange his soldiers. The geographer, the engineer. The engineer To mark out. Oh, I've messed something up.

Speaker 1:

You did. You want to start over by geometry? The architect is unable to construct his plans and execute his designs.

Speaker 2:

The general to arrange his soldiers, to arrange his soldiers. The engineer to mark out grounds for encampment. The geographer to give us the dimensions of the world and all the things there and contained. So we're back on track to delineate the extent of seas and specify the divisions of empires, provinces and kingdoms by geometry.

Speaker 1:

By it also the astronomer.

Speaker 2:

Oh, the astronomer. By it also, the astronomer is unable to make his observations and fix the duration of time and seasons, years and cycles.

Speaker 3:

And fine geometry is the foundation of mathematics Of architecture, of architecture and the root of mathematics.

Speaker 1:

Wow, sorry, you should just read these no, no man, no way, you got it, you got it, you got it.

Speaker 2:

But yeah, the advantages of geometry.

Speaker 1:

Right, I mean it is, it is the basis.

Speaker 2:

Really, it's everything Right, our society.

Speaker 1:

Everything, the mankind.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

I mean, there's no, there's no way you get around that. Mathematics, geometry, all of these seven liberal arts and sciences were given to us by our creator To to take us out of darkness into light. You can't understand the world around you, the creation that screams right that there is a designer, that there is a founder, a great architect of all this is seen through these seven liberal arts and sciences, I mean as a geometry being one of the one of the major ones. I mean, would you agree that maybe you would be able to do that?

Speaker 2:

One could say, geometry is the language by which we we read the book of nature.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely, absolutely.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's kind of like how we understand what's happening through the language of geometry, right. We get the ideas of our creator into our grammar rhetoric and we able to rail these logic to look at it scientifically. But we've talked about this before. Geometry and the shapes that we see in nature inform how we build our structures, right, and the things that we find in nature we combine and experiment with to find compounds that heal and, you know, are used for miraculous things. What, what people in the past have been doing is, you know, we've been working on a lot of things. What have literally considered miracles is just science.

Speaker 1:

To us, Right, right, yeah, and it, it, it's like I always go back to. I always go back to Sir Isaac Newton only because he's a Presbyterian, like I am, but it he said his famous quote was that it's, it's it's like I'm thinking God's thoughts after him. And geometry is simply that we are, we are seeing, we. It's a process for thinking, thoughts and seeing the way the world was made. And then taking what we see, architecture, for instance, right, you see the way a forest is, is constructed in nature. You see the way rock formations are, you see the way the earth in its foundation is, and then you, you begin to see how architecture became the foundation, the pillars, the trusses. You know the arches, the roof lines, all of those things is is seen in nature and taken by man, who's part of nature, to create these edifices that we have built, greater and greater and more complicated. Because that's it's our nature to create. It's our nature because we are a Mago day, we are made in the image and that a Mago day is in all of us. We want to create, we want to build, we want to be better, we want to strive to do good, to be in fellowship, to be part of this world. You know, and I just, I don't know man, I'm digging this just pretty.

Speaker 2:

There's very few animals that we know of in the world that learn and change through generations right few, very few yeah, I think they. I've seen that there are packs of killer whales in certain areas of the world that have learned specific hunting techniques that only those killer whales know about. Right, because the elders teach it to the youngers right and so they continue to perfect it through the generations. But it's specific to that pack right like actually beach themselves and grab animals, which no other killer whales in the world do. Right, that's interesting, and so when that particular family dies that knowledge will be lost forever. Yeah right, and this is the human species. Like we're segmented into these independent packs and some of us figure things out, and you know, we got to start looking at each other as a whole, as one species in it together, and think about our future and our survival and think you know, stop thinking about our, the line in the sand, that's my dirt, not your dirt, and I'm going to kill all of your family If you touch my sand. Like right as they say that astronauts every one of them has this experience when they see the earth from the outside, of an awakening of like wow, I've been lied to my whole life. This is such a small fragile thing in the existence of the universe. We don't have time to be fighting right separating ourselves. We need to figure out a work together here. Yeah, that they get that celestial perspective on our place which we don't get.

Speaker 1:

I totally get that. Yeah, you know, it's the age old problem, man. You know we colonization, you know for the past what a thousand years, maybe more than a thousand years, colonization has been the way where the stronger nation comes to that's the smaller nation and overtakes it and presses the weaker into service to the stronger. I mean, it started with the Babylonian Empire, you know, and then the Babylonian Empire gave way to the Medo-Persian Empire, which gave way to the Grecian Empire, which gave way to the Roman Empire, and then the Roman Empire fragmented and became basically what we see today. Now there's, as a Christian theologian, you know, there's some theology there, but I'll spare you all that stuff. But it's history. World history is a history of colonization.

Speaker 2:

Well, rome's involvement in the birth of Christianity is pretty fascinating.

Speaker 1:

Oh, it absolutely is. It's the vehicle that was used to spread it into the world. You know, by the persecution thereof, forced it to go out into the world, and that's a whole other conversation, of course, but what the point is is that even to this day, colonization continues. This, our country, our tax dollars, is used all over the world to colonize all kinds of different places. You know, we have 840 military bases all over the world and they are, they are there to show dominance and control over people, groups that we have no business being anywhere in. And look at, look at the expansion of the crown, you know, in in the 1600s, throughout the lesser Antilles, you know, down through Barbados and all the islands in the Caribbean, and they, just, they, just, they just came on to those islands and said you now belong to us, you are slaves. We have, we own all of your natural resources, were we're putting those and when we're done, we're going to leave you and you're welcome.

Speaker 2:

You can now worship us and thank you and now you have to talk like us look like us like us, and that's that's colonization, man, and and maybe, maybe, somehow, you know the.

Speaker 1:

The era of colonization is over. You know, if we're looking at, look right now in Europe, what's going on there with these wars and these color wars, fake wars, proxy wars, all for the sake of keeping the American dollar, the fiat dollar system. A lot. The world is still alive as the global financial standard people are afraid of change they don't want to change, you know, but there is change on the horizon and it's technology and it's the generation my sons who are in their 30s. You know, it's their generation, my sons and daughters. Their generation is the one that has to step up and take away that, the elite ability to, to, to colonize others, you know, and and maybe bring about some sort of independence. You know, I don't know what to call it, you know, but we all need to be free To make our own mistakes and make our own, our own choices well, we live in a country that we ourselves colonized.

Speaker 2:

It's like it's our country. You stay out of our country it's true. It's true, the crown we colonize, and the Dutch? Colonized the Eastern United States sure there were people here, there were Perfectly.

Speaker 1:

Well that that that you could argue that they were. They were in bad shape. The Indian nations were at war with each other in a big way. They were slaughtering each other. It was the same thing colonization. They were colonizing each other as well, and we came along and colonized the colonizers. They were drawing their boundary line. Yep.

Speaker 2:

I often wonder you know, you ever wonder what? Because that that's one society that wasn't allowed to progress naturally right the. Indian nation, yeah, and they're stuck in. They're stuck in preservation mode. They're trying to preserve the culture that they had at the point where we ended it. But I often wonder like what would it have evolved into if they had been allowed to, if we had never colonized America, if they had their own nation?

Speaker 3:

right. Where would that?

Speaker 1:

have gone well.

Speaker 2:

Well, it's kind of fascinating to imagine what would have happened.

Speaker 1:

I think that they were. They were a society on the on the downside of their greatness, in other words they don't think they came out of the. Aztec, you know, from the south, and the indigenous peoples came up through, for, you know, a thousand years. And then you became very tribal and right and by the time the white man came with his influenza to these shores, they were already they were. They were killing each other. It was mass slaughter all over the place. They had depleted the net, their natural resources, the buffalo and all of the, the planes. They had completely depleted.

Speaker 3:

What the Indians yeah, they were on the verge of depleting a lot of it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, they were not doing great, man, they were not doing good when we got here. Not that we helped them in any way. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that, but they were. They were slaughtering each other in a major way and they were just colonizing each other, just like we were colonizing them. And now I don't know who's going to colonize us, because we're in trouble here. Man, who's coming? Who's coming on our shores, you know, to take over and say you now belong to us? I don't know.

Speaker 2:

Aliens. Well, I think we're in this global place now. Yeah, that's probably going to become a more homogeneous one thing.

Speaker 1:

I'm not against the idea, man. I'm not against it. I'm certainly won't know it.

Speaker 2:

We won't admit it, but there's going to be probably like one real power that's pulling the strings.

Speaker 1:

We'll see, we'll see. I am a. I'm an optimist when it comes to the future, just simply because my faith dictates.

Speaker 2:

Science is is hopeful because all the great strides are making, like the web telescope, for example. Right, it takes so much money and resources that nations have to work together Right Progress science, right. You see that like there's like five major countries that are working on these projects and they're independently donating billions of dollars and their brightest minds to work together on Right and there's some hope in that I agree, and I find I do a lot, a lot of study on different things.

Speaker 1:

I just go down all these rabbit holes but I'm finding that in the European, mind set is becoming far more superior from a frontier, scientific, frontier attitude than the then the good old US of A mindset anymore. We have corrupted ourselves so badly that everything, anyone who's in charge of anything, is there as a grifter, it seems to me, who is trying to enrich themselves financially, and the government has partnered with the large corporations. You cannot tell the difference between them anymore.

Speaker 2:

Partners kind of word to use.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, partners right and and they're, you know they're. Their only goal, it seems like, is to continue to hold on to power and enrich themselves. We, we've lost that ability to work together to create, you know, some sort of scientific breakthrough. I don't see any major scientific breakthroughs coming from this country that aren't in cooperation with, you know, other nations. Yeah, it needs to be in cooperation with other nature because all we want to do is all we want to do is our elites want to hold us down and what they want to do is enrich themselves and their families at our expense. And that has to stop, and I think that is going to stop very quickly here and we are going to see a new day come out, the fourth turning. Read the book. It's a great read that I haven't you mentioned it several times the the author does not do the audio book, which I'm never a fan of, but the guy that does it is does it pretty well, so it's worth getting the fourth turning the audio books better the audio book is good. It's pretty good. It's pretty good. Yeah, the book itself is you're going to have to read it. Well, I had to read it twice because it's it's it's a little in depth, but is it's very hard to deny the fact that societies do turn on these cycles and they make a very good case that we are on that fourth and final cycle where the end of the current direction, the current leaders, the current all of it is, is crashing and coming apart. And so you can say it. Who can deny that? We see that happening all over the world Hope so. And it's crumbling and crumbling and crumbling, there'll be pain.

Speaker 3:

There'll be suffering but out of that comes, comes something better.

Speaker 1:

You know, and that's why I always say it's the generation, it's. It's not the generation of my children, who are, who are the ones who are going to have to make the difference. It's going to be up to them, not me. I'm an old man, I'm done.

Speaker 2:

I'm part of the baby boomers.

Speaker 1:

We were the problem, not the solution.

Speaker 2:

You do hear that the baby boomers were part of the big problem.

Speaker 1:

Big problem. They sold their own. They sold out their grandchildren's financial future for a zero copay.

Speaker 2:

So what? At what point does like? When did that generation stop?

Speaker 1:

See, I don't know if they ever started. So the generation before them, ok, that was the generation that actually they stepped up and went to World War One.

Speaker 3:

The greatest generation.

Speaker 1:

The greatest generation Right. The baby boomers are those who the boom of children that were produced from those people.

Speaker 3:

So these are the we, we I'm the last generation.

Speaker 1:

I'm the last year. I was born in 62. So that's the last year of the baby boomers.

Speaker 2:

OK, that's what I was asking. So 60 early 60s, right, right.

Speaker 1:

So if you're, if you were born in. My wife was born in 64. She thinks she's the last generation of boomers, but she's actually the first generation of the next, and I don't know what they call that. I don't know what they're called, but the baby boomers are. And now, if you look, I'm 60 and I'm the youngest year. So the baby boomers are all old. They're all old. They're all old. If you look at, look at our government officials, especially on the national level in Washington DC, the average age there is 82. Hello, is this thing on 82 years old Sounds like Freemasonry? Sounds like Not for long. Maybe the Freemasonry needs a fourth turning as well. Yeah, but but nothing, nothing new, nothing brave, nothing courageous can come from an 80 year old person.

Speaker 2:

The thing is like I'm not an ageist, like I think there's, don't get me wrong.

Speaker 1:

Let me say that 80 year old people I learn a lot from.

Speaker 3:

Sure, because they've been through life.

Speaker 1:

But their station in life is to share wisdom Right, not break new boundaries.

Speaker 2:

Right, right, and I think Elon Musk said this you can't. You can't shoot for eternal life, because society would never change. The only reason it changes is because generations die and young people have new ideas they can implement.

Speaker 1:

Right and he's looking at it from a worldly, purely worldly perspective. Right, this is a microcosm of that.

Speaker 2:

If we let the oldest of us run everything as long as they're there and nothing's going to change. It's not really.

Speaker 1:

No, it's not going to change. Why would it? It's not to their advantage to change anything.

Speaker 2:

The ideal situation is where you have a good representation of a cross section of your society representing you in the government. So you've got young people, people, women, you know moms, everything.

Speaker 3:

However it plays out, this is how we share.

Speaker 2:

Right Ideas.

Speaker 1:

Our founding fathers had the right idea. There's these checks and balances against each other, and people come to serve for the benefit of society and then they leave. So we were never designed to have senators that that stay for 42 years. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Well, that's the biggest. That's how you fix it. Just make them two year terms and well, our problems are gone.

Speaker 1:

Well, now you know, I would agree with you 30 years ago, but now, because the administrative state has taken on a life of its own, politicians don't really mean anything, and we can see that in the White House right now.

Speaker 2:

They can say and do what they want. It's like American gladiators they just put that guy out there to entertain us.

Speaker 1:

Yeah Well, the strings are being pulled in the back. I would say that's been true for the last 20 years myself. But I, like I said I've said it before, I get in a lot of trouble for it. But I really don't participate much in the current left versus right political scheme. It's not my, it's not my game.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's wise. Yeah, I'm just, I'm done with it. All right, man, we're only four, four of these in, I think the next one is music.

Speaker 1:

I love music.

Speaker 3:

Go music.

Speaker 2:

Is that sublime science music is that elevated science which affects the passions by sound. There are few who have not felt such charms that acknowledged its expressions to be intelligible to the heart. It is a language of delightful sensations far more eloquent than words. It breathes to the ear the clearest intimations. It touches and gently agitates the agreeable and the sublime passions. It dissolves, it wraps us in melancholy.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and lifts us enjoy and elevates us enjoy.

Speaker 2:

Man, you better finish reading.

Speaker 1:

All right, sublime. It wraps us in melancholy and elevates us enjoy. It dissolves and inflames. It melts us in tenderness and excites us to war. This science is truly congenial to the nature of man, for by its powerful charms the most discordant passions may be harmonized and brought into perfect unison. But it never sounds with such symphonic harmony as when employed in singing hymns of gratitude to the great creator of the universe. Wow, it says symphonic. It says symphonic, I learned Seraphic. Seraphic. Oh well, it is Seraphic.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah.

Speaker 1:

Seraphic. Is the? Is the the verb for symphonic right? I don't know. I don't know either. Obviously I'm somebody who are our English majors. Please chime in here. We need your help. It's beautiful, though apparently desperately. It really is beautiful. The science is truly congenial to the nature of man by his powerful charms, the most discordant passions may be harmonized.

Speaker 2:

This is like we could talk about this for an hour. We could. Music is a science.

Speaker 1:

People don't think absolutely a science in that way Do they.

Speaker 2:

But it is a science. There are particular notes in particular chords that we can agree go well together and some that don't go together, and how you arrange that and mix it at the small level and in the whole dictates beauty or it could dictate. You know, we have certain rhythms and sounds that we use only for war. Right, yeah, that's right, excite us and get us ready to like put our lives on the line when the trumpets are going right. There's music that can put you in a state where you're ready to lay down your life or fight harder, just like there's music that can make you feel like you want to hug someone or cry.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely true.

Speaker 2:

And invoke emotions like that in you.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Music can do that to us, and the people that know how to manipulate our emotions through music are mad scientists. Man.

Speaker 1:

It's really true. What you said about music is true. It is mathematic. It is three notes make a chord and so there's three. So like, for instance, the chord of A would be the A, C and E notes together, so the major being the A, so the A would be melody and then the other two would be harmony. So if I were to sing a perfect A, okay, and then two other people were to sing a perfect C and E, you would have three people singing a chord in complete harmony and it sounds really beautiful. Yeah, and it's amazing, but in guitar or piano, and you know you play piano, so you know.

Speaker 2:

Kind of I don't know what notes or chords I'm playing.

Speaker 1:

But it is part of the fabric of human life and experience. Music fits into geometry and it fits into mathematics and it fits in in such an amazing way. Well, there goes the microphone.

Speaker 2:

Sounds have.

Speaker 1:

Like those Sounds, have harmonics to them and waves?

Speaker 2:

Absolutely, oh yeah, well, they're frequencies or patterns.

Speaker 1:

Right. Yeah, 60 megahertz frequency right. And the faster the frequency goes, the higher the sound and electricity. Electricity flows on frequency, sound is a frequency and music is based in frequency and we know a good sound from a bad sound. Yeah, that's the other amazing part. Yeah. You don't have to be a musician to know that when somebody's singing off key Instinctively, it's horrible yeah.

Speaker 2:

And we I think we've talked about this before Like we're hardwired to recognize sounds and for those sounds to evoke emotions in us at our primal level. Yeah, it's true Like the high-pitched tweeting of a bird sounds soothing and relaxing to us Right and makes us feel safe Right. The low baritone growl of a large animal sends a chill down our spine.

Speaker 3:

Right Primally yeah.

Speaker 2:

Those sounds evoke emotions in us, and music is a continuation of the same.

Speaker 1:

I think, yeah, I like where you're going with that. So you know, the roar of a lion Like I, terrifying right, well, I Primal, I mean we're intelligent, we know we're safe.

Speaker 2:

But if you were in the wild and you heard that and you didn't know where it was coming from, you're having a brown pants moment. You're having a moment, yeah, Instinctively, you can't stop it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so those sounds like I exercise on Celery Hill, which is a hill. It used to be a dump.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, we turned it into a park.

Speaker 1:

But it's the closest thing we have to an actual hill here in Florida. But I work out there. Well, on the other side of it is a place called Big Cat Preserve and every time I'm out there working out you can hear, this is Florida.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, we can hear those Big Cat Preserves.

Speaker 1:

We have Big Cat Preserve. You can hear the lions roaring.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

And it is intimidating even though they're in cages 200 yards away. I mean and it does invoke this, wow, that creature is absolutely magnificent, You're not?

Speaker 2:

going to snap your neck towards that sound when you hear it Every time. Every time, it's going to hold your attention.

Speaker 1:

But the interesting thing is that music, we humans have taken sounds, have taken these sounds and we have transformed them into this system of sound, recognize sounds that provoke these emotions and convey all these messages. I mean, I know, for me, I listen to a lot of hymns, the old hymns from way back when in the 1600s and 1700s, a lot of the hymns that were written, and those hymns, when you sing them, they cause you to memorize these messages and it's so powerful and it's absolutely amazing to me how intricate the idea and concept of music is. I mean, I grew up in the 80s, you know, and so for me classic rock was everything and some of the music from that era is just absolutely stuck with me. Yeah, you know, it is absolutely like anything. Yes, the band yes Ever did is just stuck with me. Pink Floyd, and you know some of the high quality stuff from from that era of musicianship. You know, I don't I'm not going to comment on today's music, but back then it really made an impression upon me, for good or for bad. It absolutely became part of the fabric of who I am.

Speaker 2:

I think every generation probably experiences that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, absolutely.

Speaker 2:

Because in the formative years of your youth, music really is an important part of your life. It really really does help you. I'd like connect with your generation really. It does Because you all are listening to the same stuff. You all are feeling the same things. There's a connecting aspect to it.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

And then you get older and the music changes and you're like well, that's true, old days when we were all listening to this stuff.

Speaker 1:

And my parents said the same thing to me and I said yeah, my kids and I'm with you, man Right.

Speaker 2:

It was different music for my generation, but we had the same stuff.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

I hear the same crap now and I'm like this ain't easy Right?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, Well, I was like you're old I'm like no, literally, they're not singing.

Speaker 2:

They're not singing, You're making weird sounds.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, like last night I was at the shrine and out on the Tiki Hut. They got a big, beautiful Tiki Hut restaurant there that they built and yeah the. Tiki Hut. The average age is my age over there. Let's just be honest, it's an older crowd of people that go to the shrine and participate there, but for some reason the bartenders decided to put 90s, late 90s, early 2000s, hip hop. I'm sorry, it's probably even earlier stuff. I mean modern hip hop, grunting and grinding kind of female sounds coming out of this beatbox sound, yeah, and everybody in there has got this look on their face like what?

Speaker 2:

is this. You know, so yeah, they didn't catch their audience.

Speaker 1:

Huh, they did not catch the audience at all. No, they missed it completely and we're all just looking like what the heck is going on here.

Speaker 2:

But the point we go over there after lodge and they're always doing karaoke, so it's a mixed bag. Oh yeah, I might go over there.

Speaker 1:

Well, I'm not sure about karaoke is kind of defies the you know the beauty and laws of music, Right? Because you, this is a chance for people who are not musicians to get up and actually sing, and that's when you hear those horrible off tones from people who are doing their very best and trying to, you know, be a star of the show.

Speaker 2:

It's like hitting miss. You know, even in the same song, sometimes they'll be like on it and I'm like right. And then they get into the other part and you're like, ooh, do you hear yourself?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, right, right, yeah, yeah. I don't know how do we get on Music.

Speaker 1:

Oh, music, music, Music and of course it goes immediately to karaoke.

Speaker 2:

Of course, we always find the lowest way to talk about something that's right, that's right.

Speaker 1:

But the science is truly congenial to the nature of man, for by its powerful charms the most discordant passions may be harmonized and brought into perfect unison. But it never sounds with such serphonic harmony, seraphic, seraphic harmony, as when employed in singing hymns of gratitude to the great creator of the universe. I just really appreciate.

Speaker 2:

You know what they say there. It's really true. There's a people probably know this there's a Christian musical group called Hillsong. Oh yeah, it's a church but I think the out of Australia musical group really made the name for them Hillsong right and they revolutionized how churches do music.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

They made it more modernized. It's like they're using.

Speaker 1:

They turned it into a $2.5 billion year industry along the way.

Speaker 2:

It's so powerful because now, when people come to your service, they feel like they had an emotional experience a spiritual experience. They feel that and it's the music that's evoking that in them, not the message.

Speaker 3:

That's true. They don't know any different Right.

Speaker 2:

And so these at the church. I think they found music to be a powerful way to connect with their audience as well.

Speaker 1:

I think that music, music, has always been a powerful way to convey the message, but these people took it to this extreme and then changed the message to fit their narrative.

Speaker 2:

They like modernized it, I guess.

Speaker 1:

And then took it to a global audience where they all became very, very wealthy. Oh yeah, and it all fell apart in a most magnificent way.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, they're having a massive explosion.

Speaker 1:

And they've embarrassed themselves and the entire idea, which is just ridiculous.

Speaker 2:

But whatever I think the band and the people involved with making that music had good intentions. Well, there was a lady who started it.

Speaker 1:

Her name was Darlene Czech and she was like one of the early ones, beautiful voice, I mean powerful, beautiful voice, and it was in the very beginning where the ideas and the concepts that were taught through the music, the message of the music was sound, yeah, and it was good. But that woman, she became quite wealthy quite quickly and I don't know what became of her. I certainly not going to comment on her, you know her status, but I think that once it history shows us that, once the big money comes in, things change. You forget your original concept, you forget your charter and you do, you begin to do whatever you got to do to keep the money train going. And it's just human nature. You know the big money corrupts big. You know it just does.

Speaker 2:

For the good or bad of it. You can't deny that music has had a major impact on the modernization of religion.

Speaker 1:

And on that let's finish with the final one astronomy.

Speaker 2:

Astronomy, is that sublime science which inspires the contemplative mind to soar, loft, read the wisdom, strength and beauty of the great creator of the heavens. Assisted by astronomy, we ascertain the laws which govern the heavenly bodies and by which their emotions are directed.

Speaker 1:

Investigate the power by which they circulate in their in their orbs.

Speaker 2:

Discover their size, determine their distance, display their various phenomena and correct the fallacy of the senses by the light of truth. How nobly eloquent of the deity is the celestial hemisphere, spangled with the most magnificent heralds of his infinite glory. They speak to the whole universe, for there is no speech so barbarous but their language is understood. No nation so distant but their voices are heard. Among them, the heavens proclaim the glory of God. The firmament declare the work of his hands.

Speaker 1:

That quote right there is from Psalm 19.

Speaker 2:

You actually quoted that at the last podcast and it's true.

Speaker 1:

And that is probably the basis of this. Now, that's, of course, the writings of David, king David, which is Solomon's son. So we're not far off a masonry here, because a lot of masonry is based on Solomon's writings in life.

Speaker 2:

He was the wisest king, supposedly. Whoever lived?

Speaker 1:

And he was taught by his father, king David, and it proclaims that the infinite glory and astronomy is that science of star gazing, of gazing into the universe and contemplating its beauty, its magnificence and its design. My goodness, if you just look at the earth's rotation, that what is it? 27.6 degrees, a perfect pitch that runs around in this perfect circuit that continues to go, generation after generation. Move it by one degree and all life on earth ceases to exist.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

You know it's this, the fine tuning of the universe speaks of a very powerful mind that put it together and maintains it. It's really tough, in an age of scientific enlightenment, to get around that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, this is one of the great things that's happening, I think. Right now Science is helping us connect to our faith. The scientists thought they had it all figured out. It was so simple.

Speaker 3:

Right, it's very cut and dry.

Speaker 2:

This must have happened, but with the technology we have and the things we're doing now, they are realizing they've been wrong, a lot about things that they thought were for sure the way things are. And some of them are almost willing to admit it, yeah some of them almost, but I mean there's new branches of science that didn't even exist five years ago. Right, right now we are clearly in that that's how fast we're advancing.

Speaker 1:

The age of scientific enlightenment is just accelerating faster and faster and faster, and it keeps pointing to the thing that this little masonic monitor is pointing out.

Speaker 2:

Is it what we thought? Is it exactly what we thought? Was there a man, a white man with a beard in the sky, who was pointing down.

Speaker 1:

Maybe not exactly like that. Da Vinci, that's Da Vinci's painting. Yes, I get it.

Speaker 2:

But the consciousness cannot be denied. No, that's right, Even scientists now are starting to say what they're seeing is shocking. Right, the universe expansion is giving them a better understanding of that. It had a beginning, and if there was a beginning of what was before that, we clearly think we know. And then we realize we've only seen a small little speck of reality. It's so much bigger than we thought and so different than we thought. And so now, finally, the scientists are starting to finally get. We don't really know. We're seeing more, but we don't really know and we're not going to say this is this, but what I think a lot of scientists are starting to say is there is an undeniable consciousness behind everything. Undeniable, absolutely.

Speaker 1:

You can't deny it.

Speaker 2:

And you can choose not to call it God if you want. But I just talked to a PhD yesterday who has a book coming out called the God Consciousness.

Speaker 3:

Wow.

Speaker 2:

And this is a scientist, astrophysicist, who has found God through the study of the stars.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's happening more and more. You can't deny the design. And if, look, you know, if I walk by a building downtown and I tell you that this building had an architect, and if I ask you, do you know the architect? And they say no, and then they ask me well, how do you know the building had an architect? The reason I know the building had an architect is because the building exists. It's there the building exists, therefore there must have been an existor it has to be. There's just too much evidence of it. You know, and that's the basis of intelligent design, that the intelligent design theory says that, based on advanced scientific study, it is more and more clear all the time that there is a mind, a very powerful, a very advanced mind behind it Consciousness, you can call it. Yeah, you can call it. That I mean some people call it. What is it, Chi you?

Speaker 3:

can call it Well, I mean right.

Speaker 1:

But me. I'm a Christian. I call it Yahweh, but that's you know, that's some. I thought the Jews called it Yahweh, which is it just means I am, that's.

Speaker 2:

That's the name he told Moses, you actually don't use Yahweh.

Speaker 1:

I don't use the name Yahweh, no Father, son and Holy Spirit, but that's me because of my faith. You may be as a Mason from a different faith, but what we can all agree on is the concept of intelligent design and, as a matter of fact, as a Mason, you made a profession to deity, which would speak to an intelligent designer, because we call him the great architect Of the universe. I don't know what else you would consider the great architect of this magnificent, very detailed, like clockwork universe. Other than you know what I was going to say. Sorry, I got in a rabbit trial, Let me get back.

Speaker 2:

It's interesting to me Happens to both of us, I know right, those poor rabbits, man.

Speaker 1:

What's interesting to me is scientific advancement Continues to push us closer and closer and closer to a point where our scientific, empirical, scientific scientific evidence stops and something that I believe begins, because you get to a point where you just have to believe some stuff.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I mean. I think one thing that it's impossible for anyone to deny is that we currently don't have the capabilities to fully understand the nature of the universe. Absolutely we're not given those things, or even the most simple thing reality. We don't really understand it fully, and I think people are starting to agree that we may never get to understand it in our lifetimes, but it's the pursuit of the understanding that brings us closer. Every new thing we learn gives us a little bit more light and connection to whatever the creator consciousness that made. All this is Right. We are a part of it.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

We are influencing it. We are able to influence it through our own, obviously, actions, collectively, through time, not as individuals. When you look at the universe and the scale of time, it's ridiculous.

Speaker 1:

Right, and to me it always comes down to, but it's just a scale. It's a scale. What is the most plausible explanation based on the information that you currently have? And I challenge every person out there to consider why are we here? Why is there something rather than nothing? Nothing is easier. Achieving nothing is far easier than achieving this that we have seen all around us. Why, why, why? Why Ask yourself these questions? What is the most plausible explanation, given the facts that you have at your disposal, for our existence? I have done that. I spent 30 years doing it. I am convinced and I'm open. I'm open to discussion. Obviously, I'm on the show talking about that all the time, but I am convinced because I have done the work. I encourage every man out there do the work. I'm not going to do it for you. You have to do it yourself Search, seek, pray, ask, do all the things that your Masonic teaching tells you. You know what does it say? Seek, knock, ask, do all of these things and seek it with all your heart. What is the most plausible explanation? Why are you here? What is the most plausible explanation for that? It is a great study.

Speaker 2:

You will not regret it. You won't regret it, yeah, and if you do that, I doubt you're going to come to the conclusion that you're here to make yourself as wealthy, powerful and have the ability to subjugate as many other people.

Speaker 3:

Amen.

Speaker 2:

Possibly can. That's not the conclusion.

Speaker 1:

That is not going to be the conclusion.

Speaker 2:

Anyone is going to come to, regardless of where they settle on. Absolutely they're all going to be closer to. We're here to help others. We're here to connect ourselves as a species and improve the situation of our species through time and our family and our friends and the people that are connected to us we have influence over in our small lifetime, so we should use that influence to help them. That's kind of the conclusion that everyone who does any study will come to. Naturally, that's right. We ain't here to make ourselves an island unto ourselves and have all the money in the world.

Speaker 3:

You'll be miserable. You're miserable.

Speaker 1:

You'll be the most miserable person in the world, jay Paul Getty, on his deathbed. Jay Paul Getty, the wealthiest man in the world, he said I am the most miserable man on earth.

Speaker 2:

We all think money's going to fix our problems and solve things for us.

Speaker 1:

All those people. They died with their children hating them and their lives. They had all the money in the world, but they died lonely and without anything. And then, like you said, you're so right, chris that you Wow this never happens. If you seek the truth about why you're here, what is the most possible explanation? You will quickly find that it is to love others, it is to care for others.

Speaker 2:

You're living proofs that Right now you're going through one of the most traumatic things you've been through in a while and you're like I actually feel OK because I have some comfort and support and that makes it OK.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and that is what's good about life, that is what's right about life is loving and caring. You are your brother's keeper, you are responsible for the welfare of the people around you. We all are, and we find that hard to believe in this day and age, but it is. The most satisfying and fulfilling part of the human experience is giving yourself on behalf of another. That's why a true marriage is so rewarding, because you're constantly giving of yourself to another who is constantly giving themselves to you, and it's this union that builds. It's not perfect, obviously there's two humans involved, but it's a perfect example.

Speaker 3:

It wouldn't be fun if it was perfect.

Speaker 2:

No, it wouldn't be fun at all. There's no makeup. The makeup part is pretty good. Yeah, for sure.

Speaker 3:

Don't do it too often, not every day. Yeah, right, right.

Speaker 2:

No anyways the message go ahead. Yesterday I was referred a potential business opportunity, and this person happens to be a Mason from Ohio. He's never been to a lodge in Florida. But we're aware now that we're both Masons and unfortunately I'm in a room full of non-Masons so we can't geek out or anything.

Speaker 3:

Right, right, but at the end of it.

Speaker 2:

At the end of the whole meeting he slips up and the conversation turned towards that he's trying to make his company a force for good in the world and he wants to get back to charity. And we have the Masonic conversation in front of these people who, many of them, think weird things about Freemasonry. I don't clarify it to anybody, I keep it to myself in this podcast, even in my own company. But they see me dressing up and they're like wow, this guy's in a weird stuff. So now there's another one that he's never met and they're observing. And this guy's saying what we say every day and he's from Ohio. Never stepped foot in a lodge in Florida. No way. We've ever communicated. We don't even share the same system of government, but he's like the sole purpose I have in this world is to connect and help other people to make their lives a little better. And in doing that it makes my life better. And when the time comes, when I need help, I'm going to have so much of it and this is the purpose of humanity. And then I say I love it, I love what you said and I add to it. And we're speaking the same language, that's the language of Freemasonry.

Speaker 3:

It really is right.

Speaker 2:

Compassion, love, connecting charity towards others. I never met him. He's from a completely different jurisdiction, but he's a good enough Mason that he learned that from Masonry.

Speaker 1:

Right and I love what you just said. That's the language of Freemasonry is cooperation, love, respect, trying to make my area of influence better than when I found it and make the lives of the people around me better.

Speaker 2:

When you talk like that around a group of profane people in a profane world, you literally are a beacon of light in the darkness.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, you're right, people do respond, they respond to it.

Speaker 2:

People see it and they're like whoa, this feels good, there's warmth coming out of that light. I think I want to be around that and this is a little this might save me, and you draw them to you and they become interested in what the hell is this Freemasonry thing. They taught these people to think this way and they feel this way and they're acting this way. Right, I want that for me.

Speaker 1:

And it's an organizational, it's a fraternal organization of men who are trying to impact their community in a positive way by making themselves better, by making each other better, by lifting each other up. And, like you said, you're talking to a guy that you've never met, right personally, no, no never met.

Speaker 2:

Right, you're on the phone with him. And he's from Ohio, he's across the country.

Speaker 1:

He's a layman in the office.

Speaker 2:

He's working here in Florida, lives here. But, he's been so busy he hasn't been to Lodge.

Speaker 1:

So that in a while, the commonality is so striking that the people in the room are like whoa they know we've never met, but we're speaking the same language in front of them the language of Masonry Such a beautiful language to speak in the world. So that's a good segue to stop right there, and the question we would ask you guys listening, is are you speaking the language of Masonry?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, not just in the Lodge, not just around your brothers, not to look like you're the best Mason in the room.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I would but out in the world around non-Mason Right.

Speaker 2:

It's hard to do it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's right. And I would just say to my Masonic brothers what are your motivations? What is your motivation to whatever it is you're trying to do, whether inside the Lodge or outside the Lodge? Are you speaking that language? Are you speaking words of life, words of healing, or are you just trying to get your own way? Are you just trying to build your own empire? Do your own thing, change everything, because you know better than everybody else? Well, maybe you should slow down and just take a look in the mirror and ask yourself that question Are my words words of life and words of healing, or are they words of self-preservation and trying to do my own thing?

Speaker 2:

Well, that's the language the world is teaching us to speak.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's right.

Speaker 2:

And we have to learn a second language now which should be our natural language, but we grew up in this other one and we have to learn to speak this language because it's the true natural language that we should always have been speaking. But we were basically domesticated.

Speaker 1:

We're domesticated cats. Man Like an animal.

Speaker 2:

We got domesticated and now we do what they want us to do.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that's right. Which is hate each other?

Speaker 2:

and stay distracted and keep buying things.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, man Not good.

Speaker 2:

Find some happiness in this broken place that we live.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I love it. I love it. It's a great place to stop. Well, brother, another great show. We finished the fellow craft lecture, at least what we're going to give you on the fellow craft. What we could do is please please, please, get your Florida Masonic Monitor or equivalent, based on where you are at, what state you're at, and please read it. Please read the lecture, study the lecture, know these lectures.

Speaker 3:

Talk about it with other Masons.

Speaker 1:

There's so much in there. The writing is eloquent and it's well thought out and it will spark wonderful conversations for you. It'll build you up in your Masonic career and hopefully you'll take that out and you'll go speak the language of Masonry to somebody who needs it.

Speaker 2:

And that's what this show is about. I'm not perfect, red's not perfect. We're making mistakes out here publicly in front of everybody. But we keep moving forward, we keep trying to learn from our mistakes and, most importantly, we apologize. We apologize always Honestly.

Speaker 1:

I hope everybody knows that if we've said anything or done anything to offend anybody on this show, please understand that we do not claim to be perfect in any ways. We're trying our best to share something that we really love and that's our fraternal order, our fraternity of Masonry. We love it and we want to see it prosper. We want to protect it and we want to share as much of it as we can with as many people as we can, because we really believe that it has something to offer for this crumbling society.

Speaker 2:

Could be the only thing that we have to say to us in the future here.

Speaker 1:

It could be. It could be Because it transcends all faiths and it transcends all political parties. It transcends all of those things. We could be a solution, a movement for individual peace and harmony for everyone. It could happen.

Speaker 2:

It could happen. Bring back the Masonic Party, come on.

Speaker 1:

Bring back the Masonic Party.

Speaker 2:

Well, yeah, You're a first candidate, Fred.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, yeah, that's going to go over real well. Yeah, I can't be a candidate for high office. I'm not 80 years old yet.

Speaker 2:

OK, ok, you've got to wait till you're 82. We'll season you up a little, and then you'll be ready.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

All right, that's it for me. What about you, Chris? What do you got? Send us out.

Speaker 2:

Really interested. Grandmaster visits tonight. Yes, can't wait to welcome most worshipful Glenn Bishop and his grand line into our little shrine here.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, man.

Speaker 2:

That's going to be real exciting. I can tell you that I just had a text during the podcast with most worshipful Foster. Yes, we are set to record with him next Friday morning at 7.30 AM.

Speaker 3:

All right, all right Excellent.

Speaker 2:

Not next week but the week after we'll finally have most worshipful Foster's podcast. Oh, that's great.

Speaker 1:

That's great. Now he won't be at tonight's thing.

Speaker 2:

No he's not coming tonight.

Speaker 1:

All right, that's OK. So that's exciting news.

Speaker 2:

Thanks, guys, that was an awesome interview. Yeah, he's a great guy, Just so excited to get another chance to bring his voice to the world. Man yeah, absolutely.

Speaker 1:

He's one of our heavy hitters man, so we're excited to get him back.

Speaker 3:

Most worshipful Foster thank you in advance for what is going to be being very patient with us.

Speaker 1:

We most appreciate it and, yeah, I look forward to doing it and I look forward to hearing it. So, all right, all right, guys. So any questions, comments, anything at all, please just email us straight up If you don't like what you're hearing, if you feel like we've said something that is not right or that maybe we should talk about. We're always open to talk to anybody out there who feels that we have done them any kind of wrong or harm. We're 100% transparent here, man. We're not trying to harm anybody. We're trying to protect the fraternity that we love, and we hope you are too. So, like I'm trying to come up with my parting shot, and so far it's this Now that you've heard what you heard, go back to your lodge and build it strong, brother. We'll begin soon.

Exploring Masonry and Personal Development
Finding Positivity in Challenging Situations
Seven Liberal Arts Concept
Solar Probes and Free Energy
Geometry's Role in Architecture and Society
Societal Progress, Colonization, and the Future
Music and Political Discussions
Music, Astronomy, and Faith's Impact
The Language of Freemasonry
Excitement and Appreciation for an Interview

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